COVID Vaccines: Necessity, Efficacy and Safety

Covid-19 vaccines are exposing populations to serious, unnecessary and unjustified medical risks.

Abstract: COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers have been exempted from legal liability for vaccine-induced harm. It is therefore in the interests of all those authorising, enforcing and administering COVID-19 vaccinations to understand the evidence regarding the risks and benefits of these vaccines, since liability for harm will fall on them.
In short, the available evidence and science indicate that COVID-19 vaccines are unnecessary, ineffective and unsafe.


Necessity: immunocompetent individuals are protected against SARS-CoV-2 by cellular immunity. Vaccinating low-risk groups is therefore unnecessary. For immunocompromised individuals who do fall ill with COVID-19 there is a range of medical treatments that have been proven safe and effective. Vaccinating the vulnerable is therefore equally unnecessary. Both immunocompetent and vulnerable groups are better protected against variants of SARS-CoV-2 by naturally acquired immunity and by medication than by vaccination.

Efficacy: Covid-19 vaccines lack a viable mechanism of action against SARS-CoV-2 infection of the airways. Induction of antibodies cannot prevent infection by an agent such as SARS-CoV-2 that invades through the respiratory tract. Moreover, none of the vaccine trials have provided any evidence that vaccination prevents transmission of the infection by vaccinated individuals; urging vaccination to “protect others” therefore has no basis in fact.


Safety: The vaccines are dangerous to both healthy individuals and those with pre-existing chronic disease, for reasons such as the following: risk of lethal and non-lethal disruptions of blood clotting including bleeding disorders, thrombosis in the brain, stroke and heart attack; autoimmune and allergic reactions; antibody-dependent enhancement of disease; and vaccine impurities due to rushed manufacturing and unregulated production standards.


The risk-benefit calculus is therefore clear: the experimental vaccines are needless, ineffective and dangerous. Actors authorising, coercing or administering experimental COVID-19 vaccination are exposing populations and patients to serious, unnecessary, and unjustified medical risks.

COVID Vaccine Necessity, Efficacy and Safety

Asymptomatic spread: who can really spread COVID-19?

A respiratory virus needs associated symptoms in order to be clinically relevant. One year ago, this belief would have been universally accepted by the wider medical community.

The Health Secretary, addressing the nation on television on 20 December 2020 stated that ‘If you act like you have the virus, then that will stop it from spreading to others.’ This messaging is clear in the many adverts and public health announcements currently circulating.

The response to COVID-19 has been predicated on the assumption that asymptomatic PCR positive individuals can spread disease. This assumption was simply accepted as fact and, thus far, has never been adequately demonstrated in the available scientific evidence. 

This single assumption is driving most of the restrictions. It is being repeated on radio and other advertisements and is causing the populace great fear and distress. It cannot be left unscrutinised any longer. If there are flaws in PCR testing regimes that have perpetuated this idea, we must now bring them to light.

Asymptomatic spread: who can really spread COVID-19?

Understanding PCR Cycle Threshold (Ct) in SARS-CoV-2

Despite the science being clear on the threshold of PCR tests, Public Health England advised that a typical RT-PCR assay will have a maximum of 40 thermal cycles (Ct), this is despite knowing full well that PCR tests run at that threshold and higher produce a 97% chance of a false positive and are not able to distinguish whether an infectious virus is present.

This fact was addressed in the Lisbon Court of Appeal on 11/11/2020 where an international legal precedent was set.

See court ruling below.

https://lexmaxims.wordpress.com/2021/06/02/lisbon-court-of-appeal-pcr-ruling/